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No. 5 Squadron (RAAF): Second World War

No. 5 Squadron (RAAF): Second World War


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No. 5 Squadron (RAAF) during the Second World War

Aircraft - Locations - Group and Duty - Books

No.5 Squadron, RAAF, was an army cooperation squadron that served on Bougainville, New Britain and New Guinea from late in 1944 until the end of the Second World War.

The squadron was formed as No.5 (Army Cooperation) Squadron on 9 January 1941 at Laverton, Victoria, and was equipped with the Commonwealth Wirraway. It remained in Australia for more than three years, training as an army cooperation squadron and cooperating with other training exercises. The first Commonwealth Boomerangs arrived in July 1943, and were used alongside the Wirraway for the rest of the war.

The squadron moved to Bougainville Island, at the western end of the Solomon Islands, in November-December 1944. Most of the squadron's personnel arrived by sea on 15 December. The aircraft were used for army cooperation, artillery spotting, supply drops, tactical reconnaissance and low level strafing missions. They were also used to guide other Allied aircraft to their targets.

The squadrons operated a number of detached flights. One detachment operated from Cape Hoskins, on the north coast of New Britain, from February 1945. It then moved to Jacquinot Bay on the south-east coast of New Britain, and then in April 1945 to Tadji on New Guinea.

In September, the month after the end of hostilities, the squadron received its first Curtis Kittyhawks. The squadron's pilots reported that their new aircraft were excellent in flight, but more tiring than the Boomerang.

The squadron returned to Australia in January-February 1946, where it was disbanded.

Aircraft
9 January-July 1943: Commonwealth Wirraway
July 1943-August 1946: Commonwealth Boomerang and Commonwealth Wirraway
September 1945 onwards: Boomerang, Wirraway and Kittyhawk

Location
9 January 1941-May 1942-: Laverton, Victoria
May-August 1942-: Toowoomba, Queensland
-January 1943-: Toogoolawah, Queensland
-March 1943-: Kingaroy, Queensland
-June 1943-September 1944-: Mareeba, Queensland
November 1944-January 1946: Bougainville
February 1945-: Detachment to Cape Hoskins, New Britain
-April 1945: Detachment to Jacquinot Bay, New Britain
April 1945-September 1945: Detachment to Tadji, New Guinea

Squadron Codes: Wirraway Code BF

Duty
1941-44: Army Cooperation Squadron, Australia
1944-45: Army Cooperation Squadron, Bougainville, New Britain and New Guinea

Books


No 455 Squadron was formed at Williamtown, New South Wales on the 23rd of May 1941 and consisted of RAAF ground staff for a Wellington Bomber squadron. It established itself in Britain in No 5 Group Bomber Command in June 1941. Awaiting its Williamtown contingent, it was equipped with Hampdens in July and flew its first operational flight in late August 1941 against Frankfurt. It was the first Australian bomber squadron to form in Britain and was employed in both bombing and minelaying, attacking the German Fleet in 1942. No 455 was transferred to Coastal Command in April 1942 in a torpedo-bombing role. While with Coastal Command, it sent detachments to Skitten, Wick, Sumburgh, Vaenga in Russia, all between May 1942 and April 1944. No 455 was equipped with Beaufighters in October 1943 operating against German shipping off Norway and in the Baltic Sea until the end of the war. The squadron was disbanded on 25th May 1945

  • RAAF Williamtown NSW from the 23rd May 1941 (formed in Australia)
  • RAF Swinderby, Lincolnshire from the 6th of June 1941 (Hampden I)
  • RAF Wigsley, Nottinghamshire from the 8th of February 1942
  • RAF Leuchars, Fife from the 21st April 1942 (Coastal Command. Hampden I, Beaufort Ia, Beaufighter X)
  • RAF Langham, Norfolk from April 1944
  • RAF Dallachy, Caithness from the 19th of October 1944
  • disbanded the 25th May 1945

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Catalogue

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Catalogue Persistent Identifier
APA Citation

Storr, Alan. & Australian War Memorial. (2005). Second World War fatalities : 460 Squadron RAAF : RAF Bomber Command. [Canberra : Alan Storr]

MLA Citation

Storr, Alan. and Australian War Memorial. Second World War fatalities : 460 Squadron RAAF : RAF Bomber Command / [by Alan Storr] Alan Storr] [Canberra 2005

Australian/Harvard Citation

Storr, Alan. & Australian War Memorial. 2005, Second World War fatalities : 460 Squadron RAAF : RAF Bomber Command / [by Alan Storr] Alan Storr] [Canberra

Wikipedia Citation
Second World War fatalities : 460 Squadron RAAF : RAF Bomber Command / [by Alan Storr]

This volume, the result of research undertaken at the Australian War Memorial, contains summaries of RAAF 460 Squadron fatalities in date of death order. Included are the mission details, the names, ranks and musterings of crew members, and the known circumstances of the failture of aircraft to return.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

460 Squadron RAAF : World War 2 fatalities

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  • » 1,102 biographies
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"Among the men who fought on Iwo Jima, uncommon valor was a common virtue."

Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, 16 Mar 1945

The World War II Database is founded and managed by C. Peter Chen of Lava Development, LLC. The goal of this site is two fold. First, it is aiming to offer interesting and useful information about WW2. Second, it is to showcase Lava's technical capabilities.


No. 5 Squadron (RAAF): Second World War - History

Over 2.5 million African-American men registered for the draft, and black women also volunteered in large numbers. While serving in the Army, Army Air Forces, Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, they experienced discrimination and segregation but met the challenge and persevered. They served their country with distinction, made valuable contributions to the war effort, and earned high praises and commendations for their struggles and sacrifices.

Left - Howard P. Perry, the first African-American to enlist in the U.S. Marines. Breaking a 167-year-old barrier, the U.S. Marine Corps started enlisting African-Americans on June 1, 1942. The first class of 1,200 volunteers began their training three months later as members of the 51st Composite Defense Battalion at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Mid - Swearing-in of William Baldwin, the first African-American Navy recruit for General Service. June 2, 1942. Right - Reginald Brandon, the first African-American graduate of the Radio Training School of the Maritime Commission. Upon assignment he had the rank of ensign.

Left - A trio of recruits run the rugged obstacle course at Camp Lejeune while training to become fighting Leathernecks in the U.S. Marine Corps. Their excellence resulted in an expanded Navy recruitment program. April 1943. Mid - An officer returns the salute as he passes cadet fighter pilots lined up during review at Tuskegee Field, Alabama. Tuskegee Airmen flew 1,500 missions over Europe and never lost any of the bomber pilots they were assigned to protect. Right - Two Marine recruits in a light tank during training in mechanized warfare at Camp Lejeune. April 1943.

The War in Europe

Left - Brig. Gen. Benjamin O. Davis, Sr., the first African-American general in the U.S. Army, watches a Signal Corps crew erecting poles, somewhere in France. August 8, 1944. His son, Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., graduated from West Point and commanded the Tuskegee Airmen. Mid - A bazooka-man cuts loose at a German machine-gun nest some 300 yards distant. This African-American combat patrol advanced three miles north of Lucca, Italy (furthermost point occupied by American troops) to make the attack. September 7, 1944. Right - Members of an African-American mortar company of the 92nd Division pass the ammunition and fire non-stop at the Germans near Massa, Italy. This company was credited with knocking out several machine-gun nests. November 1944.

Left - The 'target for today' in Germany is revealed to an African-American P-51 Mustang fighter-bomber group during a pre-flight briefing at an air base in Italy. The men are members of the 15th U.S. Army Air Force whose planes fly as part of the Mediterranean Allied Air Force. September 1944. Mid - The P-51 pilots listen intently during their briefing. Right - Staff Sgt. Alfred D. Norris, crew chief of the fighter group, closes the canopy of a P-51 Mustang for his pilot, Capt. William T. Mattison, operations officer of the squadron.

Left - On Easter morning, William E. Thomas and Joseph Jackson will roll specially prepared 'eggs' on Hitler's lawn. March 10, 1945. Mid - Crews of U.S. light tanks stand-by awaiting the call to clean out scattered Nazi machine-gun nests in Coburg, Germany. April 25, 1945. Right - A captured Nazi, wearing civilian clothes, sits in a jeep at south gate of the walled city of Lucca, Italy, awaiting removal to a rear area. September 1944.

The Pacific War

Left - Aboard a Coast Guard-manned transport somewhere in the Pacific, these African-American Marines prepare to face the fire of Japanese gunners. February 1944. Mid - On Bougainville, African-American troops of the 24th Infantry Division wait to advance behind a tank assault on the Japanese along Empress Augusta Bay. 1944. Right - A patrol cautiously advances through the jungle in Japanese-held territory off the Numa-Numa Trail on Bougainville. These members of the 93rd Infantry Division were among the first African-American foot soldiers to go into combat in the South Pacific. May 1, 1944.

Left - 1st Sergeant Rance Richardson, a veteran of two World Wars, takes a break along the Numa-Numa Trail. April 4, 1944. Mid - On call to general quarters, five steward's mates stand at their battle stations, manning a 20mm anti-aircraft gun aboard a Coast Guard frigate in the southwest Pacific. Right - U.S. Army trucks wind along the side of the mountain over the Ledo supply road from India into Burma.

Honors and Awards

Left - Lt. Gen. George S. Patton, U.S. Third Army commander, pins the Silver Star on Private Ernest A. Jenkins of New York City for his conspicuous gallantry in the liberation of Chateaudun, France. October 13, 1944. Mid - Brig. Gen. Robert N. Young, Commanding General of the Military District of Washington, assists Melba Rose, aged 2, daughter of Mrs. Rosie L. Madison, in viewing the Silver Star posthumously awarded to her father, 1st Lt. John W. Madison, of the 92nd Infantry Division, who was killed in action in Italy. Right - Admiral Chester W. Nimitz pins the Navy Cross on Doris Miller at a ceremony on board a warship in Pearl Harbor. May 27, 1942.

Left - Staff Sgt. Timerlate Kirven (on left) and Cpl. Samuel J. Love, Sr., the first African-American Marines decorated by the famed Second Marine Division. They received Purple Hearts for wounds received in the Battle of Saipan. Mid - A gun crew of six African-Americans who were given the Navy Cross for standing by their gun when their ship was damaged during an enemy attack off the Philippines. Right - Pfc. Luther Woodward, a member of the Fourth Ammunition Company, admires the Bronze Star awarded to him for "his bravery, initiative and battle-cunning." April 17, 1945. The award was later upgraded to the Silver Star.

Women's Contribution

Left - The oath is administered to five new Navy nurses commissioned in New York. Phyllis Mae Dailey, the Navy's first African-American nurse, is second from the right. March 8, 1945. Mid - Lt.(jg.) Harriet Ida Pickens and Ens. Frances Wills, the first African-American Waves to be commissioned. December 21, 1944. Right - Lt. Florie E. Gant tends a young patient at a prisoner-of-war hospital somewhere in England. October 7, 1944.

Left - Juanita E. Gray, a former domestic worker, learns to operate a lathe at the War Production and Training Center in Washington, D.C. She was one of hundreds of African-American women trained at the center. Mid - Welders Alivia Scott, Hattie Carpenter, and Flossie Burtos are about to weld their first piece of steel on the ship SS George Washington Carver at Kaiser Shipyards in Richmond, California. 1943. Right - Auxiliaries Ruth Wade (on left) and Lucille Mayo demonstrate their ability to service trucks at Fort Huachuca, Arizona. December 8, 1942.

Postnote - On July 26, 1948, President Harry Truman signed Executive Order 9981 ending segregation in the United States Armed Forces.
Read more at the Truman Library Web site

Copyright © 1999 The History Place™ All Rights Reserved

Terms of use: Private home/school non-commercial, non-Internet re-usage only is allowed of any text, graphics, photos, audio clips, other electronic files or materials from The History Place.


Often, their crews gave them nicknames which were painted just below the cockpit. Sometimes the names were accompanied by artwork such as that of the Grim Reaper dispensing bombs on The Phantom of the Ruhr. As well as the phantom image, the aircraft’s nose is decorated with a record of operational sorties using yellow bomb symbols while a red bomb signified a trip to the ‘Big City’, as the bomber crews referred to Berlin. The inclusion of a white bomb generally indicated a daylight raid. An ice-cream cornet symbolised raids on Italian targets such as Milan and Turin. As operations (ops) go, Phantom of the Ruhr completed 121 not out.

In the 1940s, it was considered normal to depict a scantily clad or even bare-breasted young woman to accompany a female aircraft name. This, perhaps, isn’t so very different from a ship’s figurehead designed to keep sea-monsters at bay.

Lancasters of the Royal Australian Air Force had their own idiosyncratic nose symbols. For instance, Lancaster III ED664 AR-A2 Aussie on 460 Squadron RAAF at Binbrook sported an ‘Advance Australia’ badge. The 35 ops were depicted on the bomb log by kangaroos with RAAF wings and a Distinguished Flying Cross ribbon above them. Another of 460 Squadron’s Lancasters proudly displayed a flying kangaroo.

Admiral Prune in early November 1942 the smiling face in the cockpit is that of P/O Pilot Officer) Jimmy Cooper. Because the squadron often dropped sea mines on ‘gardening’ operations and at the time naval officers were attached to the unit, several of the aircraft displayed Admiral-prefixed nicknames.

It was rumoured that ED382 J-Joe, which has a portrait of Joseph Stalin on the nose, may have been so named by a ground crew member who had a copy of the Communist Daily Worker delivered every day. J-Joe operated later on 625 and 300 Squadrons and other units and survived the war.

The king inspects a line-up of ground crewmen beneath the nose of Frederick III ED989/DX-F, which has a motif derived from a caricature of W/C (Wing Commander) ‘Freddie’ Campbell Hopcroft, CO of 57 Squadron, which shared Scampton with 617 Squadron.

Lancaster B.I R5868 S-Sugar on 467 Squadron RAAF after completing its 100th op on 12 May 1944 LAC Poone adds the 100th bomb symbol. This famous Lancaster had flown 68 operations on 83 Squadron at Scampton and Wyton as Q-Queenie (July 1942–August 1943) before joining 467 Squadron RAAF at Bottesford in September. The Goering quotation, ‘NO ENEMY PLANE WILL FLY OVER THE REICH TERRITORY’, was added by LAC Willoughby, one of the engine fitters around the time that S-Sugar had completed 88 ops.

Minnie the Moocher, a name derived from ‘Cab’ Calloway’s popular slow blues song, and ground crew on 12 Squadron at Wickenby in July 1944.

Lancaster Winnie, showing that the Americans were not the only air force to decorate their bombers with nose art and other paraphernalia.

Lancaster F-Fox Ad Extremum ‘Press On Regardless’ on 550 Squadron at North Killingholme, taken after the Lancaster’s 100 th operation. In the cockpit is the skipper, F/L (Flight Lieutenant) David Shaw from Thornton in Fife.


RAN Detachment 9 Squadron RAAF

The RAN Detachment of 9 Squadron RAAF comprised eight Fleet Air Arm-pilots who were sent to 9 Squadron at intervals from February to May 1968. The pilots were first posted to 5 Squadron RAAF at Fairbairn, Australian Capital Territory, for three months operational training on Iroquois helicopters before joining 9 Squadron at Vung Tau.

Lieutenant A. A. Hill, the first of the RAN pilots, joined 9 Squadron in February. He was followed a month later by Sub-Lieutenants G. E. S. Vidal and M. J. Ward. The remaining pilots joined in May, with Lieutenant Commander R. A. Waddell-Wood becoming officer-in-charge of the detachment.

It was particularly appropriate that 9 Squadron should have acquired an RAN Detachment, as the Squadron itself began as No. 101 (Fleet Cooperation) Flight in July 1925 which was formed to provide aircraft for naval reconnaissance and survey.

In November 1928, equipped with six Supermarine Seagull seaplanes, the Flight embarked in the seaplane carrier, HMAS Albatross. In the 1930s, the Flight operated improved versions of the Seagull from RAN cruisers.

In World War II, 9 Squadron (given its present title in 1939) operated Vickers Walrus amphibians from a number of RAN ships. Detachments also served with the Royal New Zealand Air Force. 9 Squadron was disbanded in December 1944.

Re-established in 1962, 9 Squadron was equipped with Iroquois UHIB utility helicopters, and given the dual role of search and rescue and close support for the Army. It was sent to Vietnam in June 1966.

The RAN pilots joined 9 Squadron at a time when it was replacing its eight UHIB Iroquois with the more powerful and larger UHIH model and increasing its strength from eight to sixteen aircraft. In addition to the RAN detachment, thirteen pilots were supplied by the Royal New Zealand Air Force.

9 Squadron operations


Typical Nui Dat Accomodation

9 Squadron was required to operate in direct support of the 1st Australian Task Force based at Nui Dat, an abandoned rubber plantation northeast of Ba Ria, the administrative centre of Phuoc Tuy province, and nearly twenty miles from Vung Tau. From Nui Dat, task force operations ranged throughout Phuoc Tuy.

With almost all task force operations air-mobile in concept, the first major role of 9 Squadron was to provide a troop-lift capacity for the Army. In this role it was assisted by US Army helicopter companies, including the 135th (the EMUs) from November 1967 until late in 1968.

The Squadron’s second major task was resupplying troops in the field with food, ammunition, clean clothing and stores.

An equally important role was aerial fire support, and to give 9 Squadron a greater capacity for direct support of Army ground operations, a specially-modified UHIH was introduced early in 1969. The ‘Bushranger’ helicopter was a UHIH equipped with a modified XM-21 armament sub-system of two rocket pods, each holding seven 2.75 rockets two miniguns, each capable of firing 4,800 rounds per minute and two M60 machine guns, handled by door-gunners. This armament sub-system could be removed in three hours to convert the Bushranger gunship to a troopcarrying slick if additional troop lift capacity was required for an operation.

The Bushrangers, operating as a light fire team of two helicopters, escorted slicks in combat assaults, provided suppressive fire on enemy bunkers and protected MEDEVAC aircraft. They also supported slicks which inserted and extracted Army Special Air Service patrols in enemy-occupied jungle areas. The extraction of SAS patrols, especially ‘hot extractions’ when the patrols were in contact with the Viet Cong, was a particularly dangerous operation for 9 Squadron aircraft which were required to land and take-off in small clearings, or hover over jungle within range of hostile fire while taking on board the SAS members.

A high degree of flying skill was also called for in missions flown in support of troops operating in the Long Hai hills, five miles north-west of’Vung Tau, where the Viet Cong were entrenched in a complex of caves and bunkers. Here changeable air currents, few and small landing pads in the narrow valleys, and the everpresent danger of hostile small arms fire combined to place the pilots in constant jeopardy.


Iroquois helicopters of 9 Squadron RAAF flew missions in support of Australian Army units Ammunition, food and supplies were moved to forward positions in constant dawn-to-dusk operations.

9 Squadron also carried out a round-the-clock stand to for medical evacuation of wounded soldiers, who were taken to the nearest field hospital.

9 Squadron remained operational in Vietnam until November 1971. Sub Lieutenant J. R. Brown, who was the last RAN pilot to leave the Squadron, had departed in May 1969. 9 Squadron’s last helicopters were returned to Australia on board HMAS Sydney in December 1971..


LCDR R. Waddel-Wood OIC RAN Det 9 Sdn RAAF


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Comments:

  1. Dammar

    Something I do not see the feedback form or other coordinates of the blog administration.

  2. Adney

    apparently would read attentively, but did not understand



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