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Asking Questions in English
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Asking Questions in English

Learning how to ask questions is essential in any language. In English, the most common questions are known as "wh" words because they begin with those two letters: where, when, why, what, and who. They can function as adverbs, adjectives, pronouns, or other parts of speech, and are used ask for specific information.

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Polyphemus the Cyclops

The famous one-eyed giant of Greek mythology, Polyphemus first appeared in Homer's Odyssey and became a recurring character in both classical literature and later European traditions. Who Was Polyphemus? According to Homer, the giant was the son of Poseidon, the sea god, and the nymph Thoosa. He inhabited the island which is now known as Sicily with other, unnamed giants with similar afflictions.
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Definition and Examples of Attain and Obtain

The verb attain means to achieve, accomplish, or succeed in reaching a goal (usually through some effort). The verb obtain means to acquire or get possession of something. As an intransitive verb, obtain means to be prevalent or established. Examples "As you begin your college career, you should also be aware of the difference between learning things for a test or to attain a high grade versus mastering content and skills that are essential for you to succeed in life.
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Aesop's Fable of the Bundle of Sticks

An old man had a set of quarrelsome sons, always fighting with one another. On the point of death, summoned his sons around him to give them some parting advice. He ordered his servants to bring in a bundle of sticks wrapped together. To his eldest son, he commanded, "Break it." The son strained and strained, but with all his efforts was unable to break the bundle.
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Mimesis Definition and Use

Mimesis is a rhetorical term for the imitation, reenactment, or re-creation of someone else's words, ‚Äčthe manner of speaking, and/or delivery. As Matthew Potolsky notes in his book Mimesis (Routledge, 2006), "the definition of mimesis is remarkably flexible and changes greatly over time and across cultural contexts" (50).
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Flew, Flu, and Flue

The words flew, flu , and flue are homophones: they sound the same but their meanings are different. Definitions Flew is the simple past form of the verb fly , which means to move through the air, to travel by aircraft, or to move quickly or suddenly. The noun flu (a shortened form of influenza ) refers to a contagious viral infection.
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The Mohs Hardness of Coins

The Mohs scale of mineral hardness consists of ten different minerals, but some other common objects can also be used: these include the fingernail (hardness 2.5), a steel knife or window glass (5.5), a steel file (6.5), and a penny. The penny has always been assigned a hardness of around 3. But we have conducted tests and found this is not true.
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Exponential Growth Functions

Exponential functions tell the stories of explosive change. The two types of exponential functions are exponential growth and exponential decay. Four variables (percent change, time, the amount at the beginning of the time period, and the amount at the end of the time period) play roles in exponential functions.
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Why Do People Need Government?

John Lennon's "Imagine" is a beautiful song, but when he tallies up the things he can imagine us living without-possessions, religion and so on-he never asks us to imagine a world without government. The closest he comes is when he asks us to imagine that there are no countries, but that's not exactly the same thing.
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What Is a Syllable in the English Language?

A syllable is one or more letters representing a unit of spoken language consisting of a single uninterrupted sound. Adjective: syllabic . A syllable is made up of either a single vowel sound (as in the pronunciation of oh ) or a combination of vowel and consonant(s) (as in no and not ). A syllable that stands alone is called a monosyllable .
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The Origins and History of Wine Making

Wine is an alcoholic beverage made from grapes, and depending on your definition of "made from grapes" there are at least two independent inventions of it. The oldest known possible evidence for the use of grapes as part of a wine recipe with fermented rice and honey comes from China, about 9,000 years ago.
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6 Traits of Writing

The six traits of writing model provides a recipe for successful prose writing. This approach defines the ingredients of effective writing for students to practice and teachers to assess, equipping both parties with tools for strategically analyzing written work. Students can become self-sufficient and methodical writers when they learn to develop the following characteristics in their writing.
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What Are Utterances in English (Speech)?

In linguistics, an utterance is a unit of speech. In phonetic terms, an utterance is a stretch of spoken language that is preceded by silence and followed by silence or a change of speaker. (Phonemes, morphemes, and words are all considered "segments" of the stream of speech sounds that constitute an utterance.
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Is Spontaneous Generation Real?

For several centuries it was believed that living organisms could spontaneously come from nonliving matter. This idea, known as spontaneous generation, is now known to be false. Proponents of at least some aspects of spontaneous generation included well-respected philosophers and scientists such as Aristotle, Rene Descartes, William Harvey, and Isaac Newton.
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Franklin D. Roosevelt Fast Facts

Franklin Delano Roosevelt served as America's president for over 12 years, longer than any other person before or since. He was in power during the Great Depression and throughout most of World War II. His policies and decisions had and continue to have an enormous impact on America. For more in depth information, you can also read the Franklin D.
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How To Use the Spanish Preposition 'De'

De is one of the most common prepositions in Spanish. Although it usually is translated as "of" and sometimes as "from," its use is far more versatile than the translation might suggest. In fact, in certain contexts, de can be translated not only as "of" or "from," but as "with," "by," or "in," among other words, or not translated at all.
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How to Study Shakespeare's Sonnet 73

Shakespeare's Sonnet 73 is the third of four poems concerned with aging (Sonnets 71-74). It is also hailed as one of his most beautiful sonnets. The speaker in the poem suggests that his lover will love him more, the older he gets because his physical aging will remind him that he will die soon. Alternatively, he could be saying that if his lover can appreciate and love him in his decrepit state then his love must be enduring and strong.
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How the US Statehood Process Works

The process by which U.S. territories attain full statehood is, at best, an inexact art. While Article IV, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution empowers the U.S. Congress to grant statehood, the process for doing so is not specified. Key Takeaways: U.S. Statehood Process The U.S. Constitution gives Congress the power to grant statehood but does not establish the process for doing so.
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Hallstatt Culture: Early European Iron Age Culture

The Hallstatt Culture (~800 to 450 BC) is what archaeologists call the early Iron Age groups of central Europe. These groups were truly independent of one another, politically, but they were interconnected by a vast, extant trading network such that the material culture (tools, kitchenware, housing style, farming techniques) were similar across the region.
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Courses You Need to Take to Get Into Med School

Perhaps it goes without saying that gaining admission to medical school is challenging. Nearly 50,000 students submit applications each year and about 20,000 matriculate into medical school programs the following Fall semester. How do you ensure entry? While you can't ensure that you'll be accepted, you can increase your odds.
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Charles Manson and the Tate and LaBianca Murders

On the night of August 8, 1969, Charles "Tex" Watson, Susan Atkins, Patricia Krenwinkel, and Linda Kasabian were sent by Charlie to the old home of Terry Melcher at 10050 Cielo Drive. Their instructions were to kill everyone at the house and make it appear like Hinman's murder, with words and symbols written in blood on the walls.
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